About Worship

What is worship?

As my 11 faithful readers know, I was raised Lutheran. When I was in high school, I remember having friends from more, shall we say, emotional denominations and groups, and remember hearing teachings about “worship” and “praise,” things that we didn’t have to teach about in the Lutheran church. (Seriously. Keep reading…) I remember being quite confused, trying to figure out when I was praising as opposed to worshiping, etc.

Now, years later, most of us have gotten familiar with the 20-30 minutes of singing mostly vague, repetitious, elevator-rock music that has become known as “worship” where, in a manner of speaking, we try to reimburse God for what He’s given to us. Many churches also point out that collecting the offering also falls under worship, for the same reason.

At the very least, contemporary worship is a subjective exercise, where we are kind of on the honor system as to whether we actually “entered in” to worship, or just enjoyed the music.  Many people leave feeling some amount of guilt for either not feeling anything, or not being able to conjure up the same kind of emotional energy that the people around us seem to have, not realizing that many of them share the same feelings.  It’s true.  Chances are, you are one of those guilty worshipers.

Today in the church we attended, we were exhorted to focus on “entering in” to worship and giving to God.  I tended to critique the music, being a musician. I can’t help it. But, I don’t feel guilty, because I no longer believe that worship is about my emotions, or my ability to commit and focus and ignore the really terrible-sounding acoustic guitar and very awkward rhythm used on “Why I Survey the Wondrous Cross” in an attempt to make it sound more contemporary.

Worship, Lutheran-style

As providence would have it, this morning I read a great reminder about worship on the blog of a Lutheran pastor I’m Facebook friends with, entitled “”  The title aptly spells out the difference between the above-described contemporary concept of worship and Lutheran worship.  We are not talking about differences of style, such as singing choruses over hymns and liturgy, or the use of guitars and drums as opposed to organs and choirs.  I happen to think liturgy is quite important and useful, but that’s not what I’m talking about here.

The difference between the 2 philosophies of worship are striking; in fact, they are direct opposites. In contemporary worship, as with much of contemporary evangelical theology, the key is what we do for God, or do to become more spiritual, or holy, or whatever. On the other hand, Lutheran worship simply where we make ourselves available to receive from God, through the truth in the liturgy, the hymns, the Scriptures (which are read for their own sake, not as preaching texts), the sermon, and Communion. It’s not about our giving—in fact, the thought is quite ludicrous—worship is about receiving.

If we’re emotional, it’s because we are the recipients of grace, forgiveness, healing, love, and acceptance. There’s nothing for us to feel guilty about, because our performance is of no consequence. We are free to enjoy the music (the Episcopal church I like to attend has an amazing music program), even if we forget to listen to the words.  We are reminded that we are God’s—not because we “have decided to follow Jesus”—but because He chose us.

Our part, as worshipers, is to be there to receive. As the author of the article states, “The purpose of worship, therefore, is to be gathered by God around His gifts.”  He goes on to quote from the Lutheran Worship book:

Our Lord speaks and we listen. His Word bestows what it says. Faith that is born from what is heard acknowledges  the gifts, received with eager thankfulness and praise.  Saying back to Him what he has said to us, we repeat what is most true and sure…  The rhythm of our worship is from him to us, and then from us back to him. He gives his gifts, and together we receive and extol them. We build one another up as we speak to one another in psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs (Lutheran Worship, p. 6).

Whether or not we worship “Lutheran-style,” I believe that worship has nothing to do with our emotions (they simply are what they are) or our efforts (which are of no benefit) or how “holy” we are. Worship is not our “job” or “where we give back to God.” Worship is simply to be gathered around God and to receive his gifts.

I am looking forward to parts 2-7 of the article on the Lutheran understanding of worship, and will possibly post more here on the series.

 

 

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3 Responses to “About Worship”

  • Howard Says:

    Nicely done, Alden. For years, there’s been a great deal of miss-direction about these issues (I recall the popularity of the Cornwall/Carothers approaches, loosely based on materials by earlier writers like Smith Wigglesworth) on this in the 70’s, but it’s only recently, amidst liturgy ‘mangered’ worship that I’ve really begun to learn and engage in what this is really all about.

  • me Says:

    Emotions are what they are, like dashboard indicators, and are easily misinterpreted and manipulated. We can’t let our emotions control our worship. And, the fact that we feel something while in church doesn’t necessarily mean we are worshiping God; music itself provokes emotional responses. Emotions are one thing, actions are another.

    As to the second point, which I will address more later, worship can be defined as “to ascribe worth.” The best statement of worship I’ve found in the Bible is Peter’s statement, “Where else would we go? Only you have the words of life.” In worship, we acknowledge that only God is our source, and we look only to him, not our own efforts. (“…all our righteous acts are like filthy rags.”)

    Whatever we worship feeds us, and we become like that which we worship. It is the Holy Spirit at work in us, and the gift of Christ himself, during worship that brings healing and wholeness, something our own efforts cannot accomplish.

  • Fred Says:

    I guess I have to disagree with you that “worship has nothing to do with our emotions.” God is often depicted as having emotions, and emotions are as much a part of being human as is our intellect, body, and soul. Part of the power (and challenge) of worship is bringing our emotions into alignment with the reality of God. Second, to reduce, as you do, worship to merely receiving from God erases the very meaning of the word. Worship is the one thing humans can offer to God. You may have some genuine reservations about styles, but I think you really do miss the point this time, sir.

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